A Nice Gesture from Leap Motion

My school is hosting it’s annual open evening on Thursday. Last week I acquired a Leap Motion gesture sensor (3D motion control micro-sensor to be exact). It’s a very cool device that follows your fingers. This allows apps to be created that respond to hand and finger gestures. Leap Motion installs Air Space on your machine from which you can install lots of apps that developers have been building for all sorts of things from the popular game Cut The Rope to controlling your OS (Mac or Win). But when I asked for the drivers to be installed at school, we hit a problem. The licensing seems a little self-contradictory in places and the upshot was we could not install it. The following text is extracted from their EULA (highlighted by us):

You must create or have a Leap Motion Account in order to use the Airspace Store. You must keep your Leap Motion Account details secure and must not share them with anyone else.

If the Application does not include a Publisher EULA that specifies Application license rights, then following payment of the applicable fees for an Application, Publisher grants you the non-exclusive right, for the period selected by you in the case of a purchase for a rental period, and in other cases for as long as Leap Motion and the Publisher have rights to provide you that Application, to download or stream, in each case, solely as expressly permitted by Leap Motion via the Airspace Store and subject to the restrictions set forth in these Terms , copies of the applicable Application to your computer, and to view, use, and display the Application on your computer or as otherwise authorized by Leap Motion for your personal, non-commercial use only.

No Public Performance. You agree not to display content contained in Applications in whole or in part as part of any public performance or display even if no fee is charged (except where such use would not constitute a copyright infringement). Use of a tool or feature provided as an authorized part of the Airspace Store is permitted, provided that as you use the tool or feature as specifically permitted and only in the exact manner specified and enabled by Leap Motion.

Sale, Distribution or Assignment to Third Parties.You may not sell, rent, lease, redistribute, broadcast, transmit, communicate, modify, sublicense or transfer or assign your rights to Applications to any third party without authorization, including with regard to any downloads of Applications that you may obtain through the Airspace Store.

So if purchased on a non-school account this would constitute redistribution to a 3rd party

Sharing.You may not use Applications as part of any service for sharing, lending or multi-person use, or for the purpose of any other institution, except as specifically permitted and only in the exact manner specified and enabled by Leap Motion.

This is a problem in a networked multi-user environment

We were allowed to install the drivers but not any of the apps, which makes it all a bit anticlimactic. So, with five days to go until D-Day, I assembled this text in a google doc and sent it to them on twitter as well as emailing them through their website support service. Nil response. So 24 hours later, I tweeted them again stating my deadline in the tweet. Here’s a storify of the convo if you’re interested:

The result is a simple addendum to the EULA sent as an email attachment with a request to fill in the details of my school and return for them to sign and return to us. The list of apps we are allowed to use are:

  1. Touchless for Windows
  2. Touchless for Mac
  3. Flocking
  4. Lotus
  5. Kyoto
  6. Block 54

I do not have permission to share the addendum here. To summarise, it states an agreement to use the Leap Motion device and associated software in a multi-user school environment with only the above apps. #forthewin

Many thanks to the support of @PatParslow, @DannyNic, @DigitalMaverick and @SimFin. I like to think those few retweets helped motivate the @LeapMotion support team into action at what is a very busy time in their development. And thanks, of course, to the Leap Motion team for being flexible, responsive and helping us secure legit usage at school and making such a great piece of kit! I’ll write a review of the device itself when I have had spent some more time using it.

A Nice Gesture from Leap Motion

Giphy spices up staff communique

Following James Michie’s persistence on the distracting quality of giphy, I opened up the site and found myself bouncing around animated images for a while.

tweet

Some of them are awesome. And because I thought so, others might agree and included one in my weekly ICT Tip newsletter.

dog gif

The newsletter email was sent at 07:00. By 09:00, three people had said how much they liked the animated pooch! And one person said how much they liked the ICT tip. Go figure.

NB: interestingly, the person who liked the tip is an experienced user. Whereas the newsletter is aimed at beginner users, it seems it is helpful to untrained (self-taught – isn’t that pretty much all of us??) users too. Also, he said that he liked the fact the tip was only one thing at a time because it is easier to remember and bring into your skill-set.

However, the point is that a little bit of fun goes a long, long way.

Giphy spices up staff communique

Scratch Me! I must be dreaming

Quick post about some cool scratch games my Y8 learners have made. See it all on the YouTube video below. Recorded with SnagIt from TechSmith.

Props to the young people spending far more than the 30 minutes homework they are allocated to ICT each week to develop awesome games! Now I have to work out where scratch fits into the new curriculum without discrete ICT lessons. First idea is the music department where they will create animations or games and then compose their own music to accompany them. Any other great ideas out there?

Scratch Me! I must be dreaming